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SOVEREIGN MAN

It’s booming over here. What’s holding you back?

January 13, 2012
Manila, Philippines

[Editor's note: Tim Staermose is filling in today while Simon is down on the farm in Chile.]

Amid all the doom and gloom in the world economy as insolvent western nations slowly suffocate under a mountain of debt, it’s easy to forget that there are places in the world that are still BOOMING.

I went out to dinner with a friend in Manila last night. Each of the first three restaurants we wanted to go to were completely booked. There is construction everywhere in Manila’s central business district. The roads are chock full with bumper-to-bumper traffic. Shops are full. People are spending money.

My dinner companion last night is an executive with a major international bank. He’s new to the country, and on Wednesday was given a tour of the stock exchange. As he stood on the trading floor, the Philippines’ benchmark PHISIX index hit an ALL TIME HIGH.

The government’s fiscal balance is improving, not deteriorating. 20% of the funds earmarked for “stimulus” last year are still in reserve. They simply weren’t needed.

Like in most of the world, benchmark interest rates are at an all-time low. The difference is that, unlike in the west, banks are confident to lend, and consumers are confident to borrow and spend. Commerce is still happening. This is not an isolated example.

In Thailand, my contacts tell me employment is so strong it’s hard to even find service staff for bars and restaurants. And this is in a place that was recently devastated by floods.

Simon has written about the booms in Cambodia, and Mongolia. Myanmar is slowly but surely opening up, and there are already hordes of opportunity seekers descending on Yangon.

It’s a message that we’ve stressed in our conversations with you before. But, it bears repeating. If you’re willing to look beyond your current horizons, there are alternatives out there.

And the message is getting out.

When I first moved to the Philippines 14 years ago, young expats like me were VERY thin on the ground. Sure, there was a motley assortment of non-natives living here. But they were generally older, grizzled veterans, if you know what I mean.

Nowadays, I see many younger people, including those with families. More tourists are also coming. One of the biggest new groups of visitors are the Russians.

Already a force in the Thai tourism industry, Russians appear to be checking out the Philippines as well. My wife reports that the area where she has her surf hotel is bustling with Russian kite surfers now.

Back here in Manila’s CBD where I spend most of my time, I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the whole character of the place is changing. And there is lots of opportunity.

 Its booming over here. Whats holding you back?
 Manila’s modern and exciting central business district

I have ideas for at least 3 businesses that could be a big success here — two in real estate, and one that would utilize the large pool of educated, English speaking labor here to provide a service that could be marketed internationally.

I don’t have the time to execute on these ideas at the present time. But, if anyone is interested in hearing about them, or willing to roll up their sleeves and help me make them a reality, I’d be interested to hear from you.

If you’re stuck in a rut back home and finding fulfillment in life hard to come by, or you just aren’t seeing any opportunities, I urge you to look internationally.

I did it. As a young graduate straight out of the Australian National University, I headed off to work in South Korea. I haven’t looked back since. I couldn’t imagine a life that wasn’t filled with new and different experiences all around the world. This is my reality.

Talking the talk is one thing. Walking the walk is something entirely different. And one of my resolutions this year is to help more people in this community actually EXECUTE on the things that we talk about.

If only 1% of the people who read this take action, it will have been well worth it. As Simon often asks, “What’s holding you back?”


 

 

About the author: Born to a Danish father and British mother, in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, Tim Staermose has led an international life since the day he was born. Growing up, he also lived in Egypt, Denmark, and Singapore, before eventually settling in Australia, where he completed his education and took out citizenship. Since then he has also lived and worked in Hong Kong, and Manila, Philippines, in the field of equity research — both for a bulge-bracket Wall Street investment bank, and for an independent investment research firm. Today, when not traveling the globe looking for investment and business opportunities for the Sovereign Man community and catching up with his diverse, multinational group of friends, he divides his time between Hong Kong, and the Philippines.

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Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Domlanic

    Great to hear, Tim- I’m totally in agreement. 

    My early life in UK was conservative, timid but then, I grew up in a small isolated village so had little idea. Eventually migrated to NZ, then on to Australia and never looked back, working in Holland and Norway as opportunity arose. Now semi-retired am looking to spend time in a Mediterranean country & buy a property. 
    Most people are so inert, scared, emotionally tied that they cannot conceive of any alternative and it is a tragedy, really. 

    • Gene

      “Most people are so inert, scared, emotionally tied that they cannot
      conceive of any alternative and it is a tragedy, really.”

      Exactly right! And it’s all self-imposed constraints, none of it based in reality.

  • Aaron Lane

    I’m ready. Sign me up, Tim. How do I reach you to begin the venture?

  • Greg

    Tim,
    I am extremely interested in hearing more about your ideas.  I’m the son of two Filipino immigrants, and I have a lot of great connections in the Philippines and South Korea.  My family owns land in Dagupan and property in Makati.  I’ve been waiting for the right idea and opportunity to start something great in the PI.  Please email me when you have the chance— kuyagreg@yahoo.com.

    Greg

  • http://political-religious-connection.blogspot.com/ James M Palmer

    Say, I would like to know more! There isn’t anything really holding me back and I am ready to jump in the right direction. Look forward to your reply.
    Regards
    James Palmer

    • nfordham3rd

      invest in a gumball machine within a mall if there’s nothing holding you back.

      what is simon black gonna tell you which will make you act? 

  • Contrarianism

    Tim, seriously? You say, “I have a few business ideas so if you’d like to hear about them give me a call?” And your last post, “We should move our money to an international bank, but I’m not allowed to tell you where?” And, “Regulatory constraints unfortunately prevent us from mentioning the bank names in this public forum”.

    I would venture a guess subscribers that follow this site are far better educated and more informed than most folks, so articles masquerading as sales pitches or sounding like multilevel late-night-no-money-down infomercials are not likely going to fly with this audience.

    Please don’t treat us as if we were the typical know-nothing dumb-ass American. If we were, we wouldn’t be on this site.

    Respectfully,
     - Contrarian

    • Gene

      It would be dumb to spell out how things work on a public website. It would ruin stuff and those of us who are actually doing it would have to figure out a new way. There’s nothing to be gained from schooling wanna-be’s in a public forum.

      • nfordham3rd

        Smart people read and research on their own.

        Dumbasses read Sovereign Man, and research on Sovereign Man alone.

        “There’s nothing to be gained from schooling wanna-be’s in a public forum.”

        No, Gene, there’s plenty to be gained. Sovereign Man will fleece readers for THOUSANDS. Do not get it twisted.

      • Gene

        Heh. I don’t know anything about the business side of this forum. I read this site because I see stuff here that lines up exactly with my view of the world, and especially the US. BTW, I like your posts, you tell it like it is. Well done.

    • Trclaggett

       Right on! Contrarian , I have been following Mr. Black since his days with Casey, although I agree with  principles,and have relocated myself out side the USA.
       I find the elements of secrecy lends to make the site less than legit. First Panama now Chile, wouldn’t  Mr. Blacks intelligence background given him a heads up on the changes in Panama’s policies.
       
      Running around the world and being in a country   a few days playing secret agent / investment tycoon hardly lets one know what really is going on. 
      I will continue to follow the site but hope that some of the shrouds of secrecy are lifted.

  • disqus_TLcMqwnySr

    Attaining escape velocity gets harder over time, especially when broke.

    • Gene

      Nonsense! It’s EASIER if you’re broke..you are having NO success in the US so you lose nothing by leaving. It’s those of us who come from 6-fig salaries who have the hardest time leaving….but feel free to indulge your excuses if it makes you feel better.

      • CraigStrand66

        Easier if you are broke? Are you serious?

        LOL, since they cant afford a plane ticket should they sail to the PH? Then where will they stay? In some dump hostel? How will they find work? How will they handle the humidity?

      • Gene

        LOL. yup, the humidity….that’s what’s holding ‘em back!

      • disqus_TLcMqwnySr

        You do what you must; a 40C night spent in an alleyway is always preferable to zero freedom.

        The real difficulty is the initial escape; everything else is progress.

        From the US, there are only two options without being able to afford even a discount bus ticket: stay and survive, or walk to the border.

        Staying means finding work, living off the land or begging. Work is a dwindling possibility, even in a lot of major urban areas. Living off the land is something completely alien to most Americans. Begging could probably result in obtaining a government handout in the form of room & board.

        Leaving means either paying for travel or hiking. Depending on how far from a border and what area, that can be prohibitively expensive or potentially deadly. Either way, without a passport, there’s even more than can go wrong.

        Regardless, feeding oneself is the biggest issue. Hunting, snaring, trapping? Great. Handouts? Dumpster diving? Begging? Sure, if you can. Subsisting on the sympathy of others is actually more difficult than you might expect.

        So no, it is not “easier” in any way without the wealth to buy a way out. It is the motivation which becomes so great that the will is strong enough to push past and away from the barriers; the well-meaning, cradling support that has now become a prison.

        If Americans had been enduring devastating depression and destitution for a decade, things might be different. As it is now, most are hardly even aware of some individuals falling off of unemployment. Those that have fallen have only become penniless within the past year or two. They make up a very small percentage of the nation. The awareness, the skills, the fortitude – it isn’t there yet. When Occupy Wall Street gives up and the faces around you become tired, lifeless – that’s when Americans will be on hard times and there will be a real effort to break free.

      • disqus_TLcMqwnySr

        You do what you must; a 40C night spent in an alleyway is always preferable to zero freedom.

        The real difficulty is the initial escape; everything else is progress.

        From the US, there are only two options without being able to afford even a discount bus ticket: stay and survive, or walk to the border.

        Staying means finding work, living off the land or begging. Work is a dwindling possibility, even in a lot of major urban areas. Living off the land is something completely alien to most Americans. Begging could probably result in obtaining a government handout in the form of room & board.

        Leaving means either paying for travel or hiking. Depending on how far from a border and what area, that can be prohibitively expensive or potentially deadly. Either way, without a passport, there’s even more than can go wrong.

        Regardless, feeding oneself is the biggest issue. Hunting, snaring, trapping? Great. Handouts? Dumpster diving? Begging? Sure, if you can. Subsisting on the sympathy of others is actually more difficult than you might expect.

        So no, it is not “easier” in any way without the wealth to buy a way out. It is the motivation which becomes so great that the will is strong enough to push past and away from the barriers; the well-meaning, cradling support that has now become a prison.

        If Americans had been enduring devastating depression and destitution for a decade, things might be different. As it is now, most are hardly even aware of some individuals falling off of unemployment. Those that have fallen have only become penniless within the past year or two. They make up a very small percentage of the nation. The awareness, the skills, the fortitude – it isn’t there yet. When Occupy Wall Street gives up and the faces around you become tired, lifeless – that’s when Americans will be on hard times and there will be a real effort to break free.

  • Gov Broomcloset Monitor

    Would love to leave but the bank account just registered at $72.00. 
    New Years Resolution 2012:Leave the USSA. Find real non-Potemkin economy enhancing business opportunities in order to achieve this.
    Not to self: Mainstream USSA corporate media has the veracity of Disney Channel.

  • Fledesma

    Tim, let’s get in touch and discuss your ideas. I’m here on the ground in the Philippines. Been here the past 3+ years involved in real estate, retail and agriculture. I echo your sentiment, it’s most definitely booming here. I can be reached at fledesma@gmail.com.

  • http://twitter.com/A1SocialNews News Hack

    Hi Tim,
    I have been doing business in Thailand for 8 years and have recently been exploring ideas for the Philippines. If this “I have ideas for at least 3 businesses that could be a big success here” is not a sales pitch I am interested in hearing more.
    Geoff Reid.
    boat@thaiboating.com 

    • milosh zorica

      @twitter-421337746:disqus I am consulting a Croatia-based yachting web startup and would like to talk to you. Both, one of cofounders and I have spent plenty of time in Thailand

  • Errol Roget

    Hello Tim,

    I live in LapuLapu, Cebu and I am very interested in your business ideas as mentioned. Also I have been wanting to meet or contact you for some time now.

    I am retired and flexible.

    Errol.
    llewey@ymail.com

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Joseph-Huntington/100003193914141 Joseph Huntington

    I moved to the Philippines 5 years ago. I’ve watched my friends and family in USA getting closer to understanding that this knife IS the sharpest in the drawer. I love it here! Busy as possible…microscopic government friction. Freedom everywhere.

    • Gene

      If you love it, you need to stop talking about it. You will soon find that it’s your fellow westerners who will be the ones that eventually ruin your paradise..and I speak from experience.

  • JTapiador

    Hi Tim,

    I’m from the Philippines and a subscriber of SovereignMan. I’m interested in hearing your ideas. I have mine too and I would like to share these as well. Perhaps we can swap ideas and collaborate? Let’s get together sometime within the month of January and meet somewhere in Makati or Fort? I would appreciate if you send me an email if it pushes through or not.

    Best Regards,
    j.tapiador@gmail.com

  • Digitallando

    Nothing is holding me back, I am definitely leaving my country and family behind for a long, long time. I may spend the rest of my life outside of America. I have been taking real steps, receiving a 2nd passport this month, this young guy is finding a new place in the world far away from his hometown very soon.

  • Colin

    How would you propose an expat get around the Philippine laws that preclude expats from owning businesses (or land) in the country?
    Anyone who is not a citizen of the Philippines must take on a Filipino partner to open any business. A MAJORITY partner. In the deals I have seen, the Filipino partner brings nothing else to the table than his citizenship – no capital, no work, no connections. Buy he owns the majority of the firm and gets the lion’s share of any profits.
    What might happen if the Filipino partner decides that he wants to own the entire company that you have built up? There are many examples of what happens then, ask around and you’ll find out.
    The topic of doing business in the Philippines has been discussed on this blog before, by the way, but never in any detail, and the obstacles are usually glossed over.

    • nfordham3rd

      colin, out of all the comments, you have to be the only sane person who is wanting to create dialogue. i understand your post completely.

      when you start a business in the philippines as a foreigner, i feel that there is really no advantage as you’ve pointed out. my filipino majority parter who is nothing but a PI national does nothing but breathe air.

      education, infrastructure, and society in the philippines is lackluster to say the least. education is a joke where their colleges are like american middle schools, infrastructures are meddled with inefficiencies and bribery systems, and society? they are brainwashed out of analytical thinking by the government exponentially more than america’s…

      hahaha, i wish it were possible to youtube some of the commenters’ lives on this blog. record your reaction when you land in the Pines or Chile after liquidating your life as you formerly knew it.

      • CraigStrand3

        I lived in the PH for 3 years and this info is right on the money. Expatriation is great when you have lots of money and can buy more services and freedom in the 3rd world. For the average person, its a different story.

      • Amvendor

        This also holds true for Thailand.  Nevertheless, I’ve decided to take the plunge and I am starting up a business here.  I am married to a Thai citizen, so some of the “silent partners” are going to be members of her family.  Having been married to the same person for more than 20 years I feel that the risk is substantially reduced.  

        Left behind a 6 figure income and comfortable lifestyle in the US and starting from scratch here.  Actually extremely excited and looking forward to the challenge!  For those in doubt, there are lots of opportunities in SE Asia.

    • Gene

      This sounds very similar to other countries in the area. Usually the way it works is you find a “trusted” law firm to act as the % partner in your target country…I don’t like it much, but that’s how it works. It’s also possible that you can open a “branch” of a foreign company in the target country. Never been to Philippines, but am sure there are ways to get things done there. It’s easy find problems, the fun/challenge is in overcoming them to get what you want.

  • J8

    I come from a business background and recently got into the english teaching field. I would be interested in discussing your ideas on international english speaking talent as I was considering opening my own but have run into legal issues. I have spent 2 years in asia and am very comfortable here with degrees in Finance and international relations and a year of teaching experience. 

  • Lakeland1

    What are the opportunities for building / construction .

    I am a seasoned construction / builder , that has always
    thought about the simpler life and a new oportinity / expat.

  • milosh zorica

    Tim, a great post, man! I got a venture in Argentina where I employ English speaking expats and market their services globally. Please, drop me a line to miloshzorica(at)gmail(dot)com so we can have a chat by skype

    Cheers
    M.

  • CAadvisor

    Tim,

    I’m not as cynical as some.  I’m willing to hear and evaluate and maybe I can help.  In process of building home in PH.  Please send me the info. 

    Thanks,

    MH

    • nfordham3rd

      who are you to “evaluate”? why don’t u just come outright and say what you mean which is, tell me your ideas so i can shamelessly do the same thing or do what you tell me.

  • William R Nicholson

    If you think you’d be interested in working with the old residence guard for Joe Montana ( residence security while he was w/ 49ers ) please add me to your list. Still single and in good health. Nick . Stone Mountain,Ga. USA 678-334-9605 wrjnicholson@msn.com

    • nfordham3rd

      by far the most sheep like comment of the whole post.
      name, email and contacts provided. why not leave your address, birthday, and social too?

      • William R Nicholson

        Please tell me when you actually do something it’s easy to shoot someone else as a sheep but I believe everyone here preety much knows now whom is the least likely to get off their behind and actually do something. Wouldn’t be too surprised to find out only exotic destination for you was the one visit to Disneyland

      • nfordham3rd

        i go around the globe twice a year, although this is still a fraction of the travelling which “simon black” does.

        now you? considering that you were the security for an american football player, i am putting my money on the fact that you watched a house from getting robbed from most your life which puts YOU at the only been to disneyland column.

        if you can tell me how much buko costs by the liter, i’ll know you left the mainland.

        but on another note, you did not touch on the subject of you being a fool leaving all of your contact info on a blog comment board.

  • Rus737

    Hey Tim!  Was in Manila & Alabang in May and have many friends and contacts there.  Contact me asap!

    Rusty (rus7337 gmail)

    • nfordham3rd

      comment translation: “hopefully he thinks that the friends and contacts that i have, which i’ve done nothing with myself so far, will make him want to become friends with me”

  • SG

    I am interested in knowing more about the real estate business ideas you have and ready to roll up my sleeves so to speak in order to make them a reality.
    Please write me to samueleg at hotmail.it

    • nfordham3rd

      comment translation: “please tell me what to do, step by step, as i don’t have a brain”

  • Mario

    Hello Tim,
    This is Mario. I am all “in’ with your proposal. Please contact me. I am “retired” and living in the PH the last 7 months. I am free and available. Thanks.
    Mario 

    • nfordham3rd

      “free and available” = bored and purposeless

  • nfordham3rd

    I laugh at all you stupid commenters who are treating this post as some kind of invitation from Simon Black to collaborate together in business.

    #1. Posted by Colin – “How would you propose an expat get around the Philippine laws that preclude expats from owning businesses (or land) in the country? 
    Anyone who is not a citizen of the Philippines must take on a Filipino partner to open any business. A MAJORITY partner. In the deals I have seen, the Filipino partner brings nothing else to the table than his citizenship – no capital, no work, no connections. Buy he owns the majority of the firm and gets the lion’s share of any profits.
    What might happen if the Filipino partner decides that he wants to own the entire company that you have built up? There are many examples of what happens then, ask around and you’ll find out.
    The topic of doing business in the Philippines has been discussed on this blog before, by the way, but never in any detail, and the obstacles are usually glossed over.”
    #1.5 – Because of #1, you are absolutely locked out of opportunity. Please allow Simon Black TO NOT cover this point.

    LOL. I like this blog as it allows one to think outside of the box, but to those dummies that are taking Simon Black as gospel, you guys are retarded.

    Simon Black is as much of a person as Tyler Durden is a person. Wake up.

  • nfordham3rd

    The number of people posting up their
    NAMES
    NUMBERS
    &
    CONTACT INFORMATION…

    you guys are blind sheep walking into a cave full of wolves. stop expecting another man to bring you prosperity. grow some balls.

  • nfordham3rd

    That picture of the Manila skyline is sure nice. But all of you people who have stayed on American soil for your whole life, when you land in NAIA airport, you will wish you were back in your suburbian paradisos.

    LOL. I am still shocked at how stupid some of you commenters are.

    Here’s my email. Here’s my number. Let’s do business together!!!

    LOL. Yeah right. You guys will start a business together after you pay 2000 dollars to fly to East Europe, Pay thousands for some seminar where he gives you his “contacts”, LOL.

    Kill yourselves, guys. That’ll make the world a whole lot better.

    What’s worse than a sheep? A sheep thinking he’s smarter than the rest, yet walking the same way into the slaughterhouse as the rest.

    Giving money to Simon Black or doing business with Simon Black will not save you!

  • nfordham3rd

    As an author who publishes ANONYMOUSLY for PROFIT, do you really expect him to contact you peons that leave your contact information in the comments?

    I only comment about this topic because unfortunately, I was as dumb as you people before.

    Read sovereign man to open your mind. Depend on your own efforts to better your existence. Stop trying to cling on Simon Black’s balls to the promised land. Just cuz this dipshit says Chile/Philippines is the future, you don’t believe him out the gate.

    And trust me when I write this.
    If you’re WHITE. you’ll be the first to be murdered if there is any financial collapse worldwide in the Philippines.

    GUA-RAN-FUCKIN’-TEED.

    They murder foreigners for 1000 pesos, which is 24 USD, on a sunny day in the Philippine Islands and get away with it.

    Open your eyes sheeple. QUESTION EVERYTHING!

    • CAadvisor

      nfordham3rd, assuming you have no personal agenda against Simon, I commend you for your counterbalance opinions.  Much of it is spot on.  Most importantly in PH, you must have relationships you can trust to start any venture. 

      • nfordham3rd

        I have no personal agenda towards Simon. He’s getting his paper and I am not gonna lie, I come to this site to get another opinion which I do appreciate from time to time. Sometimes there happens to be bullshit which this post happens to fit in in my book. 

        I am just more disappointed to find out with such next level topics being discussed, a lot of the comments (majority) were in the elementary realm which seemed very cult, group think like.

    • Guidocedolia

      This I can further confirm..A friend of mine was killed in Narra after marrying a local. He tried to help many locals and that was his downfall..everyone was looking for a handout.  He was generous to a fault and they sturck him a car and dump 

  • Leo

    I have been going to the Philippines since 1994, and was not in the military.  I am not a sex tourist.  I am a man who loves the country and the people, and I am moving there permanently in February.  I have traveled from Laoag to the north and Davao to the south, and never had a problem, in maybe 15 visits.  I have stayed a week and stayed a year, loving it. 

    The people are generally good-hearted and nice if YOU are, but, a few are motivated by money and lying seems to be one of the Spanish heritages. 

    I say that opportunity abounds, if you make true friends and treat the people well. 

    As for ownership, what is that?  It is the ability to use property.  So, the way to control and have full use of property is to establish a Filipino trust for the benefit of some Filipino under Filipino law, and be the trustee.  You have an attorney write the trust indenture to your satisfaction giving you all of the rights and authority you want, and you buy, hold, do business, and pay yourself whatever you want, as Trustee.

    Oh, and you use common sense.  Make friends and hang and work with them, then, if they say, “don’t go there”, don’t go there.  Simple.  And, do not flaunt wealth, be kind and courteous, speak simple, clear English with good manners, and learn a few words of Tagalog.

    One more thing: treat the women well, and you will be totally taken care of.  After having Filipina girl friends, I would not pay any attention to American women again.  Ladies, sorry, just speaking my truth.

  • Bobbear

    A different perspective.

    I read the article and forwarded it to a businessman friend in Manila.  His reply:Exports are down due to lack of demand in the U.S. and Europe. Many garment factories have closed down, and there has been a noticeable slowdown in electronic and I.T. component exports as well, this is not a good sign.The country is being sustained by Filipino overseas workers sending money home to support their families. This is what keeps the country going. If there is a slowdown in overseas hiring in developed countries, which is projected, the results could be disastrous.Currently there around 250,000 nurses looking for jobs, to no avail. The real estate boom in Makati and Fort Bonifacio is showing signs of dissipating as prices are dropping and demand is waning.

    • nfordham3rd

      Thank you VERY MUCH for coming in with more counterbalancing information.

      To explain to the people who are NOT in the know with Filipino life, government, and infrastructure, let me explain.

      The average Filipino hourly income is no more than $1-2 USD. This is for “college educated and graduated” Filipinos. Masters degrees holders are not much more than that.

      For a Filipino to get a job in the “real world”, they would have to start at the very bottom, and work up their way up the corporate ladder which pretty much doesn’t exist.

      The only way for a Filipino to get any sort of income is for them to get jobs overseas in the US, UK, Singapore, (any Westernized nation). There are no opportunities back home which leave room for advancement and an easier life.

      So MAJORITY of the educated, the best the country has in terms of a workforce, LEAVE. They leave to another country and Western Union the money back home. This money is taxed. The government gets their more than fair share. But this is the money that keeps the country afloat.

      Why would a government keep an infrastructure and a system which exports all of its talent elsewhere?

      If their government doesn’t take care of their own people, what on earth makes you think that you’d be any kind of priority.

      I iterate this again. At the sign of any financial collapse, if you’re WHITE, you’re first.

      Why?

      Because you have been the “prosperity” that the media has shown us for the last 100+ years!!!

      Philippines. Chile. It’ll be the same there.
      It’ll be the same as Atlanta, GA.

      You better have your infrastructure ready wherever you may be.

    • nfordham3rd

      Thank you VERY MUCH for coming in with more counterbalancing information.

      To explain to the people who are NOT in the know with Filipino life, government, and infrastructure, let me explain.

      The average Filipino hourly income is no more than $1-2 USD. This is for “college educated and graduated” Filipinos. Masters degrees holders are not much more than that.

      For a Filipino to get a job in the “real world”, they would have to start at the very bottom, and work up their way up the corporate ladder which pretty much doesn’t exist.

      The only way for a Filipino to get any sort of income is for them to get jobs overseas in the US, UK, Singapore, (any Westernized nation). There are no opportunities back home which leave room for advancement and an easier life.

      So MAJORITY of the educated, the best the country has in terms of a workforce, LEAVE. They leave to another country and Western Union the money back home. This money is taxed. The government gets their more than fair share. But this is the money that keeps the country afloat.

      Why would a government keep an infrastructure and a system which exports all of its talent elsewhere?

      If their government doesn’t take care of their own people, what on earth makes you think that you’d be any kind of priority.

      I iterate this again. At the sign of any financial collapse, if you’re WHITE, you’re first.

      Why?

      Because you have been the “prosperity” that the media has shown us for the last 100+ years!!!

      Philippines. Chile. It’ll be the same there.
      It’ll be the same as Atlanta, GA.

      You better have your infrastructure ready wherever you may be.

    • nfordham3rd

      Thank you VERY MUCH for coming in with more counterbalancing information.

      To explain to the people who are NOT in the know with Filipino life, government, and infrastructure, let me explain.

      The average Filipino hourly income is no more than $1-2 USD. This is for “college educated and graduated” Filipinos. Masters degrees holders are not much more than that.

      For a Filipino to get a job in the “real world”, they would have to start at the very bottom, and work up their way up the corporate ladder which pretty much doesn’t exist.

      The only way for a Filipino to get any sort of income is for them to get jobs overseas in the US, UK, Singapore, (any Westernized nation). There are no opportunities back home which leave room for advancement and an easier life.

      So MAJORITY of the educated, the best the country has in terms of a workforce, LEAVE. They leave to another country and Western Union the money back home. This money is taxed. The government gets their more than fair share. But this is the money that keeps the country afloat.

      Why would a government keep an infrastructure and a system which exports all of its talent elsewhere?

      If their government doesn’t take care of their own people, what on earth makes you think that you’d be any kind of priority.

      I iterate this again. At the sign of any financial collapse, if you’re WHITE, you’re first.

      Why?

      Because you have been the “prosperity” that the media has shown us for the last 100+ years!!!

      Philippines. Chile. It’ll be the same there.
      It’ll be the same as Atlanta, GA.

      You better have your infrastructure ready wherever you may be.

  • http://www.mikefrommaine.com/ Mike From Maine

    A lot of people complain about how bad things are at home, but they don’t have the guts to make a change. I’m glad that you show that if you can take the chance you can have a nice life somewhere else in the world.

  • Freedom2012

    Tim, could you please go into details about what type of opportunities are emerging in Myanmar?  Is it just that everything and anything seems to be growing there?  I know that economic sanctions prevent Americans from doing business there right now, but what can citizens of other nations do?  Can you briefly describe real estate opportunities, English proficiency, and the general climate in Myanmar in your next post please?

  • Cartertile

    Simon,
    Im a Canadian and when I visit the the U.S. it’s like being in Canada. The language, the street signs, traffic lights etc. As a Canadian should I be worried that my government will pursue the same policies as the U.S. government that you often speak about.
    Carmelo Figliano

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