Four ways the “experts” have proven that they are insane this week

There’s an old saying that people often misattribute to Albert Einstein– that ‘the definition of insanity is repeating the same thing over and over again while expecting a different result.’

The saying has become a bit of a cliché, but there is actually some truth to it.

About 80 years ago, a psychologist named George Kelly became fascinated with the way human beings make decisions, and he developed a framework that he called the Personal Construct Theory.

Kelly’s Personal Construct Theory suggests that people behave and make decisions based on their unique sets of life experiences.

For example, a child who is constantly spoiled and coddled by helicopter parents may (according to Kelly’s theory) grow up to expect constant support and safety nets… and make life decisions accordingly.

Kelly theorized that, over time, human beings often behave poorly and make bad decisions because their personal constructs are flawed.

In fact in his 1955 book The Psychology of Personal Constructs, Kelly wrote “we may define a [psychological] disorder as any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation.”

Kelly, in other words, defined insanity (or at least a psychological disorder) as repeatedly relying on a flawed way of thinking.

This is clearly the psychological state of most of our ‘leadership’ today.

They have a very specific worldview, which, like Kelly’s theory suggests, is based on their experiences.

The President of the United States loved to brag during his campaign about his decades of political and diplomatic experience.

The Speaker of the US House of Representatives likewise has decades of experience that has formed the foundation of her worldview and decision-making process.

Anthony Fauci has decades of experience atop one of the largest public health agencies in the world.

But it turns out that these collective decades and decades of experiences have resulted in terrible decisions… and even worse outcomes.

Based on Kelly’s theory, however, these people are incapable of learning from their mistakes and making better decisions.

Even though their decisions have been consistently wrong, these people are unable to adjust their thinking. They continue relying on the same, flawed decision-making constructs, which are based on their decades of experience.

Kelly used the right terminology for this– a psychological disorder. And that aptly sums up the ‘leadership’.

These are the so-called experts. And they broke the world. But as I’ve written before, their regime is quickly coming to an end.

Listen in to today’s podcast as we walk you through four key examples of their disorder that we suffered through literally just in the past few days.

About the author

Simon Black

About the author

James Hickman (aka Simon Black) is an international investor, entrepreneur, and founder of Sovereign Man. His free daily e-letter Notes from the Field is about using the experiences from his life and travels to help you achieve more freedom, make more money, keep more of it, and protect it all from bankrupt governments.

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