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SOVEREIGN MAN

Got grandparents? Four places where you can become a citizen

Second citizenships

I awoke this morning to an excited email from a longtime friend who wrote,

“Guess who is going to be officially confirmed as a Polish citizen next month? Yours truly! Now, it’s just matter of waiting to be assigned the Polish version of a social security number and pick up the physical passport. ”

No doubt, if you’re part of the lucky bloodline club because your grandparents happen to have been a certain nationality at birth, it’s possible that their citizenship might pass on to you.

This is, by far, the fastest, easiest, and most cost effective way to obtaining a second citizenship.

Let’s pause for a moment, though, and explore why one would want second citizenship.

When you have all of your eggs in one basket, i.e. you live, work, bank, invest, buy real estate, store your gold, structure your company, operate your business, surf the web, etc. all within the same country of your citizenship, you’re taking on a lot of ‘sovereign’ risk.

If one thing goes wrong in that country, whether you end up on some 3-letter agency’s list, or you get sued because your neighbor’s stupid kid fell in your swimming pool, suddenly all of those assets and interests are at risk.

With the click of a mouse button, a single phone call, or the whisk of a fountain pen, any judge or bureaucrat can shut you out. They can put a lien on your home, freeze your bank account, confiscate your personal property, shut you out of your email, shutter your business, seize your gold, etc.

This is the whole point of international diversification… what I call ’planting multiple flags’. If you use the system against itself and spread those assets and interests around the globe– banking in Hong Kong, structuring a company in Nevis, basing an email account in Norway, storing gold in Singapore, etc.

With this level of diversification, suddenly those assets no longer fall under the control of a single government.

The ultimate in this international diversification is obtaining second citizenship; aside from being a fantastic insurance policy, it’s a ticket to a whole new world of opportunity and freedom.

To give you an example, buried deep within Senate Bill 1813 are provisions that would allow the US government to rescind the passports of US citizens if they are deemed to be seriously delinquent in their tax obligations.

As tax matters are typically administrative issues, however, there would be no court hearing to see if there has actually been any wrongdoing, no judicial appeal. Just punishment.

Such provisions hardly seem appropriate in the Land of the Free, yet the bill is a testament to how far the basic liberties of the American people have been eroded over the years.

In this capacity, a second passport would provide instant options. For someone who has been wrongfully impugned, a second passport is like a get out of jail free card.

Moreover, it gives you the right to live and work in another country (or perhaps several), increasing your options and potential new experiences around the world. You’ll find that you can do business in more places, travel more freely, and have greater comfort and security in your life.

As I’m fond of saying, nobody ever hijacks an airplane and threatens to kill all the Lithuanians. There are no evil men in caves plotting to blow up buildings in Uruguay. There are no angry crowds in Karachi protesting civilian casualties from Panama’s unmanned drone fleet.

And perhaps most importantly, there are no banks or brokerages around the world closing their doors to Slovenians simply because nobody wants to do business with their government.

Now, there are a number of ways to obtain a second citizenship… but again, the quickest and cheapest route is if you happen to be part of the lucky bloodline club.

Certain countries observe what’s called ‘jus sanguinis‘, or right of blood, which means that citizenship is determined by lineage rather than place of birth. Some countries even extend the right of citizenship to grandchildren of nationals… meaning that if you have a grandparent from one of these countries, you could be entitled to citizenship as well.

Some of these countries are:

1. Poland

The rules for receiving Polish citizenship from a grandparent are a bit convoluted, but if you have Polish ancestors in your bloodline, it may be worth contacting a firm like CK Law Office (cklawoffice.eu) in Warsaw; they’ve helped a number of Sovereign Man readers obtain Polish passports.

2. Italy

Not quite as complicated as the Polish nationality law, Italy also confers citizenship to descendants of certain Italian nationals going back two generations. You can find out more at MyItalianCitizenship.com

3. Ireland

As we have discussed before, Ireland has perhaps the most clear laws in conferring citizenship to descendants of Irish nationals. You have to do the legwork in finding the right documents, check out www.AnClanGael.com for assistance.

4. Germany

It’s not exactly a cheery subject, but Germany confers citizenship for children and grandchildren of former Germans who were deprived of their citizenship status between January 30, 1933 and May 8, 1945 on racial, political, or ethnic grounds.  You can read more about it here.

5. India

While not quite full citizenship, individuals with Indian ancestors as far as three generations back (great grandparents) can apply for a Person of Indian Origin (PIO) Card. A PIO Card entitles the holder to live, work, attend school, own property, etc. on parity with an Indian citizen. The only restrictions are voting or holding public office.

About the author: Simon Black is an international investor, entrepreneur, permanent traveler, free man, and founder of Sovereign Man. His free daily e-letter and crash course is about using the experiences from his life and travels to help you achieve more freedom.

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Comments on this entry are closed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ben.dunphy Ben Dunphy

    Another 
    jus sanguinis country is Canada. And although they’re not far behind USSA re: terror threats etc (even though no one really wants to attack them…yet), their govt at least had the decency to admit its wrongdoing in wrongly sending one of their citizens, Maher Arar, to the US govt, where he was then tortured and sent to Syria and tortured some more for a year until they realized that, hey, he’s not a terrorist after all. They also gave him 9 million bucks. Greenwald has a good overview of this case: 
    http://www.salon.com/2012/04/23/federal_judge_complicity/singleton/

  • Happinessa

    It is sooo funny. I am Polish. 12 years ago I went to the US to give birth to my daughter just to give her American passport. Nothing specific in mind, just in case. 
    And now Americans want Polish passports … it is funny. And it is tragic, in a way. 

  • Gues1969

    What if u have no ties with any of those countries listed above?  Just a pure bred African American…what options are available to blacks who want a second citizenship, but no lineage outside of America or Africa?

    • Crooklyncat619

      You’re screwed, unless you do what Simon is suggesting. Better get to working in another country. Or have a butt load of cash to “invest” in a country that allows citizenship in return for you bringing revenue to their country. Other than that U B FOOKED…..

      • Gues1969

        LOL…@Crooklyn.  I guess ur right.  Thanks.  I do appreciate UR response

      • 1voluntaryist

        You are only limited by your imagination. If you don’t move from country to country frequently or need a bank account in a foreign country where you have moved, you might not need a second passport. Getting out of the U.S. is as easy as slipping across the many unguarded roads into Canada. Once there, your US passport should work. Or you could get a forged Canadian one. 

      • Nick

        How is that possible? Unguarded?

  • Biggi Fraley

    If you have citizenship in a county other than the US already, would you recommend getting the US citizenship as your second citizenship (assuming one qualifies, of course)? At the moment there seem to be so many disadvantages to being an American. What would be some of the advantages of US citizenship, other than the general diversification described in this article? Thanks!

  • Guest

    Why do keep talking about these bloodline citizenships when so few of us have that opportunity?

    When I saw the topic, I expected some useful information, but no, that’s safely tucked away behind your pay-wall..

  • Nate

    Very insightful post. I never have trusted the government, but this really shows you why you should not. When the boot is on your neck, it doesn’t matter if it’s the left or right one. International diversification gets rid of the US Government’s monopoly on you and yours. 

  • PIONEER_EXPEDITIONER

    Simon, I am a U.S. citizen by birth but I have inherited Swiss citizenship through my father who emigrated to the U.S. in his 20′s. My mothers family however is Romanian, (my great-grandmother emigrated here from Romania). I was wondering if you could shed some light on Romanian citizenship and if at all possible, direct me where to go to see if I qualify. Thanks in advance and thank you for all the information you provide us every day.

    • Kindn3ss

      Hey, What will be the reason you will want to gain Romanian citizenship. I’m both Romanian and American citizen (native Romanian), and my wife’s looking to emigrate from USA. We’re digging now to see what our best option is, but at this moment with the politics that are not stable at all, Romania is my last resort). We were even thinking at one point to go there, buy a house and live there for good, but… not for now. I hope Romania will become what once used to be “the grain exporter in the whole Europe”. kindn3ss at yahoo dot com is my c0nt4ct. :)

  • Crooklyncat619

    I put in for my Chilean citizenship in January and am awaiting paperwork. The gentleman who processed my paperwork stated that the turnaround time is in the 6 month range. Thank god I came across you site because I had no idea I was privileged to dual citizenship on the account of my mothers’ nationality!! I have NO problem leaving the US when, not if, BUT WHEN things get too RIDICULOUS! I’m a veteran and am so ashamed of how STUPID most of the people in America have become.

    Everywhere I go, most people here think America is getting better????? They sound like the MSM when I talk to them about the crazy things going down as we speak! ” Things are getting better”, ” Oblahma has done AWESOME”, ” We SHOULD have checkpoints everywhere”…. IM LIKE, SERIUOSLY?? Are you people THAT stupid? And of course the answer is YES.

    I always wondered how the German people could let it get that bad, NOW I KNOW HOW! I’m SO GLAD that I will have the opportunity to leave this police state when the time is right. Good luck to all who are awake and not as fortunate as us “bloodline babies”.

    • Steve Kraemer

      I hate to burst your rant bubble against Obama… However, the “US Police State” actually began under the Bush administration in September 2001 after the WTC attacks. Obama’s basically under tons of pressure by Republican members of Congress to implement all kinds of “paranoia”. When he leaves office, the “Bush-era” tactics will be back in place (and stiffer than ever), if a Democrat isn’t elected to Presidency in 2016.

      • Lucas Petrykowski

        9/11 was a false flag attack allowed by our own government. Yes, Bush started the police state but Obama has sent it over the edge. Saying that Obama inherited this mess is like saying that firefighters inherit a fire, true! They don’t go around spraying gasoline on it though!!!

  • Christina

    Simon, are you at all worried that citizenship with a European nation could soon become as burdensome as being a U.S. citizen, in terms of making you less able to open a bank account, etc?  For example the Greek government may start to really crack down on offshore bank accounts of Greek citizens. So are you worried that having that Greek citizenship, Spanish citizenship, French citizenship (just look at Francois Hollande), or citizenship from most countries in Europe, may hinder one’s lifestyle instead of giving one freedom?  I guess you’re answer may be that you could always renounce it if becomes a problem.  However, given where Europe is headed, do you think it’s worth the time and effort?  Bureaucracy in Europe is pretty bad so getting citizenship is not easy.  I’d love your input.

    • elorac

      F Hollande has plans to tax french citizens living in other countries, starting with belgium Switzerland and Liechstenstein .the rest to follow… there is a talk of taxing retrospectively french living abroad . if we do not comply the threat is we will loose our french citizenship.(this has to become law) and is against the french constitution. the other is if one lives abroad we might have to fill tax return to the french and be tax (on top of what we already pay). they decide how much!

  • Nyjetswin2005

    You forgot to mention Israel. The Jewish state grants all Jews and any person who can prove Jewish decent Israeli citizenship when they immgrate to Israel.

    • Lucas Petrykowski

      However, if you’re Palestinian, you better move out of the way of that bulldozer coming to raze your home.

  • Hiday_happy

    one day i ask them they said my neighboor hate me…i read their’s diaries

  • Luke_Cane

    To my understanding, people who are Chinese by bloodline but not Chinese by citizenship are able to easily gain PRC citizenship and a passport if they choose to return to China.  Becoming a PRC citizen might not be the most liberating passport out there, nor is being under supervision of the communist party, but it does allow a pathway towards Hong Kong citizenship and a Hong Kong passport (cannot obtain a HK passport without PRC citizenship).

    At least that is my understanding of the situation – can anyone verify?

  • P Titanic

    Hungary also passed a law in 2011 on ‘Ethnic Citizenship’, which is what I am going after. All you have to do is to show the possibility of Hungarian ethnicity (citizenship certificates, id cards, etc, whereas birth certificates are more scrutinized); have a basic knowledge of the language (there is no benchmark), and have a clean criminal check (usually through your local police). There is also the “economic citizenship” where you are granted citizenship if you invest a certain amount of money into a certain country (these are usually smaller, dilapidated countries). The final one is based on services to a country. In France, if you join the French Foreign Legion for a set perio of years or are injured while on duty, you earn French citizenship. The French also give citizenship if you provide ‘honorable and exemplary services to the French nation’ (I am not sure what thise means, but I would assume providing some form of national help).

    That’s My 2-cents!
    Paul

  • http://www.facebook.com/Burk.Elder.Hale.III Burk Elder Hale
  • http://www.facebook.com/stmartinez1 S Thania Martinez

    Simon, while 2nd passports are a good idea for US citizens, they are not the “silver bullet” many present them as. For example your 2nd passport will still have your place of birth as the United States and most offshore banking countries like Switzerland that prohibit US citizens will not allow you to open a bank account if you where born in the US unless you have successfully renounced your US citizenship and can prove it. Those who only relinquish their US citizenship in favor of a new passport and citizenship will find that OFACT’s new regulation regarding the reporting of US citizens by foreign financial institutions will still apply to them. The result is the IRS will come knocking on your door if you do not report your offshore account and pay the appropriate taxes, if they simply do not charge you with tax evasion and have your extradited back to the US. The only real solutions is to fully renouncing your US citizenship and pay the wealth tax if it applies. Most second citizenship programs never discuss this important topic.

    • 1voluntaryist

      The victim must be “ratted out” by the bank. The solution is simple. Get a forged passport. Banks are not interested in investigation. They want business. I would bet this is cheaper and quicker. 

  • Gues1969

    Sovereign Man, I am curious as to your response for African Americans with other national descent…what are their options?  Or is claiming second citizenship only available to those NOT born in Africa?  Thanks!

  • Rmi016

    When in some cases it takes 2 yrs to obtain that second passport, things could have gotten pretty nasty, be it in the US or elsewhere. The world is at a point where timing is of the essence.

    Perhaps, if some of us get together, form a sovereign country and offer citizenships within a month of applying, or less, we would have a viable solution and then some.

    Regards,
    RI

  • Delia Lopez ForCongress

    If you have a passport you can get a tourist visa good for 6 months to visit Mexico, speak English? You can apply for a work permit to teach it, apply for temporary residence then citizenship.  

    • sangramjit singh

      heloo mam…im from Indian,,mam,,im belong to poor family but educated family,,,i want work here,,,,is it possible for me to get free visa from ur country..can u help me mam..i never forget ur help…hope u understand me..and my poverty…plzzz help me mam..my contact no is,,,+919988037408..God bless u always ,,

      • suhurley

        Request denied.

      • Pastor Jack

        AHHH HAHA LOL
        I can’t breath too funny

  • Zenith Ma

    OMG!What a stupid article!

  • Pingback: Getting Started | The Passport Blog

  • Pastor Jack

    If you had two passports, you could travel to off limits countries like Cuba. Fly out somewhere on your US passport, then fly from there to Cuba on your, Say, Swedish Passport. When you fly back home to US, show your US passport which was stamped in some country other than Cuba.
    God help you if you are caught though.

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