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SOVEREIGN MAN

Four Valuable Passports that Anyone Can Obtain

The idea of international diversification is a simple one– if you live, work, hold investments, own property, structure your business, store gold, etc. in the same country as your citizenship, then you truly have all of your eggs in one very fragile basket.

If just one little thing goes wrong, whether it’s a court case, divorce settlement, political instability, government agency ‘administrative error’, or some noxious bureaucrat who’s out to get you, all of those aspects of your life can be put at extreme risk.

The idea of ‘planting flags’, or diversifying internationally, involves spreading these aspects of your life across multiple jurisdictions and territories overseas. Banking in one place. Setting up a brokerage in another. Investing in another. Storing gold in another. Owning property in another.

You can do this with dozens, potentially hundreds of aspects of your life and/or business– using an offshore email account, obtaining medical treatment overseas, seeking personal companionship abroad, setting up an overseas credit card processor for a web business, initiating an IPO for your company on an overseas exchange, foreign health insurance, etc.

Taking these kinds of steps can make your life much, much easier. Suddenly all of those aspects of your life no longer fall under the jurisdiction of your home government; legions of blood-sucking bureaucrats no longer have access to confiscate your assets and frustrate your life with a few mouse clicks.

Potentially the most important and most powerful aspect of your life to diversify, however, is citizenship. I view this as the ultimate insurance policy– something that you hope you’ll never have to use, but you’ll really be glad you have it in case you do.

Having a second citizenship is like having a ‘get out of jail free’ card. It creates options. No matter what happens in the world, you’ll always have a place to go. You’ll always have a ticket out. And as I’m fond of saying, nobody ever hijacks an airplane and threatens to kill all the Lithuanians. Second citizenship does bring a greater sense of security.

Obtaining citizenship, however, is elusive for many people. Some people are lucky enough to come from a line of Irish, Polish, or Italian ancestors. For most, though, it takes a combination of three things:

  • Money
  • Time
  • Flexibility

If you’re willing to simply pay for it, there are certain countries like St. Kitts and Dominica which offer citizenship to people who are simply willing to pay. Most folks unfortunately can’t afford the $250,000+ price tag that’s required, so that leaves the other two.

Just about every country is willing to eventually naturalize permanent residents who reside in the country for a particular amount of time. It varies greatly from place to place. This past weekend, I learned from a subscriber who came down to Chile that, in Japan, it takes two decades of continuous residence.

Other places, like Belgium, offer naturalization after as little as three years, possibly two in extreme circumstances. This is a much easier option for most people, especially for such a valuable passport.

Then there’s the ability to obtain citizenship through what I call ‘flexibility’. This may include something like getting married to a local, which in many countries can provide an extremely rapid path to naturalization.

As an example, I’d like to outline a few options below of high quality passports that anyone can obtain with either time and/or flexibility:

1. Singapore

Easily the most valuable travel document on the planet, a Singaporean can travel almost anywhere without a visa, including to the US and Europe. It takes two years of residence after obtaining permanent residency to qualify for naturalization. And obtaining permanent residence is a snap– you can simply set up a local company to qualify.

Pitfalls: Singapore does have mandatory national service, and it’s important to review the rules to find out whether you would fall within the window.

2. Brazil

There are two great things about Brazil. One, they refuse to extradite their citizens to answer for foreign crimes. It just doesn’t happen. Two, ANYONE can be Brazilian, whatever their ethnicity– black, white, brown, it doesn’t matter. Brazil is a huge melting pot. We are all Brazilian.

Brazil is the KING of ‘flexible’ citizenship options– getting married, adopting a child, hell even adopting a rain forest in some cases. And it can happen in as little as six-months to three years. Just don’t expect the process to be crystal clear.

3. Israel

Speaking of flexible, if you’re willing to become Jewish, the State of Israel’s Right of Return entitles you to citizenship. Make no mistake, though, it’s not just going through the motions– you have to work with local religious leaders and actually make the conversion before they’re willing to go through the process.

Pitfalls: The downside of Israeli citizenship should be clear as military service is compulsory.

4. Belgium

At its core, Belgium’s naturalization laws allow foreigners who have maintained residence in the country for three years to apply for citizenship. “Residence” can either be in Belgium, or even abroad so long as you can demonstrate ties to Belgium, i.e. family, friends, employment, property ownership, paying taxes, etc.

Aside from being an incredibly valuable travel document, Belgian naturalization also passes to all minor children– in other words, if you become a naturalized Belgian, your kids do too.

Our goal is simple: To help you achieve personal liberty and financial prosperity no matter what happens.

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About the author: Simon Black is an international investor, entrepreneur, permanent traveler, free man, and founder of Sovereign Man. His free daily e-letter and crash course is about using the experiences from his life and travels to help you achieve more freedom.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Elai

    Don’t you have to give up your other citizenships if you get singaporean citizenship Simon?

    • Seb

      Elai, you are right. You can’t have two passports being Singaporean. Simon failed on this.

      I live in Singapore since 2 years and I wouldn’t hesitate to take citizenship if this wouldn’t require me to drop my other citizenship. National Service is not an issues for those who take up citizenship, however it will be for your kids.

      2 english speaking countries Simon didn’t provide here are Australia and New Zealand. In Australia you can get citizenship within 2-3 years. In New Zealand within 5-7 years. The latter is easier to achieve for self employed but takes longer time.

      • Stephen

        How about obtaining residency and then citizenship by buying a property in one of the carribean island nations? Is this a viable option?

      • nomadcapitalist

        Citizenship in Australia is 4 years with PR. You can get PR if you’re in an in-demand field, but it’s trickier (or more expensive) for many entrepreneurs. You also have to actually live there 75% of the time.

    • Greg Morell

       Yes, you do.  Singapore does not allow dual citizenship.

  • http://twitter.com/alyosha19 Al Cadena

    Thanks–what about Mexico?

  • Gsmth51

    Elai – you are correct on Singaporean citizenship. It’s illegal for Singaporean citizens to hold dual/mutliple citizenships. Wealthy foreigners (US/EU/etc) who move to Singapore do so for residency status and see it as a favorable corporate jurisdiction. Example: Rogers & Friedland both maintain residency, but will not touch Singaporean citizenship with a ten-foot pole.

    Singaporean passports are mainly attractive to those who have a) a desire to renounce citizenship of their home country and b) do not plan on obtaining additional citizenship in the future. This option, therefore, is attractive to wealthy, globetrotting Chinese that currently have restrictive passports. Example: Jet Li (actor) and Gong Li (actress) both traded in their Chinese passports to become Singaporean citizens.

  • Dadelaw

    Yes, Elai, you do. In fact, the entire information is dangerous nonsense. Not only can you NOT obtain permanent residence in Singapore by “setting up a company”, it is VERY HARD to obtain PR status in Singapore these days. Setting up a company only allows you an employment pass which has to be renewed every year or two. PR status requires you to wait and reapply maybe several times AND THERE IS NO GUARANTEE YOU WILL EVER OBTAIN IT. Whoever wrote this article simply hasn’t done his homework. They don’t know what they’re talking about. Simple as that. I live in Singapore!

    • nomadcapitalist

      Yes, Singapore is making it much tougher. Seems Entrepass will become practically impossible to get later this year. And registration (not naturalization, there is no such thing in Singapore) requirements have gone up.

  • http://twitter.com/MichaelPorfirio Michael Mason


    2) BRAZIL. There are two great things about Brazil. One, they refuse to extradite their citizens to answer for foreign crimes. It just doesn’t happen.”

    Are you 100% on this?

    - MPM

    • Utopian

      Brazil has an extradition treaty with the US, there are very few countries that have no extradition treaty and no diplomatic relations with the US, and I don’t think you’d want to live in any of them.

      http://www.panamalaw.org/USA_and_extradition_treaties.html

      • Chiku_3k

         Switzerland does not extradiate its citizen.

      • Evelinfroes

        In this case Brazil only extradits americans, Brazil will never extradits brazilians to USA, that’s a constitutional fact.

      • nomadcapitalist

        I’d be careful reading PanamaLaw. There are a number of decent countries with no US extradition treaties: Brunei, Maldives, Indonesia, China, Kuwait, Qatar, Vietnam, UAE. Even Russia or Cambodia wouldn’t be horrible. You might not like the government in all of these places, or have the freedom to protest against them freely, but that’s beside the point.

    • http://www.jameslstreet.com/ MC1171611

      Are you really concerned about extradition? lol

    • Evelinfroes

      Yes, I am 100% sure. I am a Law graduate, but I don’t work as a lawyer anymore.

  • CS

    Yeah, we can all afford to go live in these countries for years.  You overlooked one of the easiest….Irish passport for people whose parents or grandparents were born in Ireland.  No residency.  Come on now, get with it.

    • Guest

       He actually said unless you are Irish, Italian or Polish…

    • Chloe Blue

      Also, I’ve read that if your parents or grandparents, who came from Italy, renounced their citizenship there, then their descendants do not qualify.
      If I’m wrong, please correct me. I’d love to get dual citizenship there.

  • Games

    Don’t forget about the world passport, issued to anyone who is a citizen of the world out of washington dc

    • StuckInUK4Now

      The plus points of the World Passport is that it’s cheap (from USD 45 for a 3-year passport to USD 100 for an 8-year passport), it looks impressive, and it’s useful to have as a ‘camouflage’ passport to hand over instead of the real thing if you’re targeted by street criminals.

      The minus points are simply that it’s not a great deal of use for crossing borders unless you can tell a good story and the official on duty at the border is either stupid, bribeable, or both. Yes, the World Service Authority posts a long list of scans of visas indicating that most countries have let people in with it from time to time, but they list only six countries that have ever officially recognised it: Burkina Faso, Ecuador, Mauretania, Tanzania, Togo and Zambia.

      And according to the Wikipedia article (yes, I know, I know, the ‘black hole’ of accuracy) on the World Passport, Burkina Faso and Zambia allegedly no longer accept it.

      That said, we can all imagine dire circumstances in which Ecuador or Tanzania might seem attractive options (on the other hand, I can’t really imagine anything sufficiently dire to make an arid sandpit like Mauretania a preferable option). So, given that it’s relatively cheap, it’s worthwhile getting one – as long as you recognize the severe limitations of it.

      • Gret

         Additional limitation: the PP must be recognized by both the country you are leaving from and the one you are entering.I don’t know of any direct flights from Ecuador to Tanzania.

        Before you buy the document buy the paperback (out of print but available used) by the founder, read of his fun times in foreign jails when being deported, then decide if the ‘World Service Authority’ document is right for you.

    • Guest

       What the heck?  The world isn’t a country.  How can it have citizens?

  • The Mighty Tig

    This title is misleading.  For starters, “anyone” cannot get an Israeli passport; you have to be a Jew recognized by the Israeli gov’t.  It’s not as easy as you think.  Given the growing anti-Semitic climate worldwide (thanks in no small part to the rise of militant Islam) why would you even want to become an Israeli citizen?  If you’re in a foreign country, would you want a terrorist catching you with an Israeli passport?  As for those other three countries?  You’d better check with the U.S. State Dept. or a good immigration attorney to see how holding one of those passports might impact your American citizenship.

    • Uqsqvnnm

      Its useful to cross borders in the West and neutral countries like China. Im also pretty sure that Israel doesnt extradite. There are several Russian billionaire criminals chilling there. Finally, Israel has the same citizenship laws as most Western countries: live there x years and apply. For Jews, its an accelerated path. The thing is, few people have any interest in moving there because opportunities outside high tech are limited, language difficulties, and Europe is a short hop away, so Euros dont need to move there.

  • stileo

    My grandmother was Irish. I’m trying to locate her birth certificate in County Mayo. I can get dual citizenship, but my wife and daughters can’t. Are there any actual advantages to becoming a PIIGS?

    • Leon Patterson

      I understand that anyone who can prove Irish ancestry can get citizenship. My grandmother was born in  County Cork and I have a photocopy of her birth record in the parish records. Try http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/

    • Evelinfroes

      It’s better to become a BRICS actually. Times are changing.

  • Dholroyd216

    Al Cadena asked about Mexico. You can enter as either an FM3 or FM2 but FM2 is easier. You have to actually live in Mexico most of the time. I had to renew my FM3 every year, a process that takes 3 appointments over 3 weeks. After about 4 and a half years you can apply for citizenship, with the effective date of the application being after five years. When I went through there were supposed to be tests on the Spanish language and Mexican history. The tests did not exist until later so I got a bye on them. The actual citizenship application takes an average of about a year and a half because everything has to be sent to Mexico City and every document must be absolutely perfect. You have to get a new FM3 after five years and keep renewing it until your naturalization letter is received.

  • Dholroyd216

    Michael Mason asked about Brazil. A Mexican singer called Gloria Trevi was wanted because her organization allowed male members to rape female groupies. She fled to Brazil. While in jail there she became pregnant. Nobody but her and the fellow who provided this service knows how or when she became pregnant. She had her baby and then was sent back to Mexico. This happened probably five years ago. This is the only case I know of where the mother of a citizen was deported. I believe that she became a citizen when her baby was born.

    She is still a famous singer in Mexico.

    • marcos989

      She probably was sent back because the paperwork was processed (so they say) before the child was born. it is my understanding one the child is born nobody is extradited, regardless the crime.

  • Hjltare

    Simon, 

    Regarding Japanese citizenship, my understanding is that a person needs to be living in Japan for 5 years or more.

    Check article 5 of Japan’s Nationality Law. 
    http://www.moj.go.jp/ENGLISH/information/tnl-01.html 

    HJ

    • Oly

      This is true, though it’s not automatically given.

      Ironically, getting permanent residency in Japan is actually a higher bar, typically requiring 10 years (down to 5 as of this July in special cases).

      Japan also does not allow dual citizenship, though Simon’s comments about that above apply in Japan as well.

      • Gret

         Japan also requires good command of Japanese language, and other indicators of being integrated into Japanese society.  Even if you obtain Japanese citizenship, as a practical matter fitting in socially is very difficult.  This is often the case even with those who are ethnically Japanese but were born and lived abroad and thus do not speak like a native.

  • Noni Mausse

    The US does NOT recognize dual citizenship but other countries do. It would be useful to know which countries will allow you dual citizenship without necessarily giving up your American.

    • Ganymede50

      What about all those neocons with dual US & Israeli citizenship? Do they get a pass for being members of the Tribe?

    • http://twitter.com/ParatrooperJJ ParatrooperJJ

      Incorrect – the US does recongnize it.

      • http://www.jameslstreet.com/ MC1171611

        You are correct: the US recognizes dual citizenship but does not allow it; i.e. you have to give up your citizenship to become an American citizen.

        (But then you still wouldn’t be eligible to be the President ;)

      • Gret

        Although the US requires those becoming naturalized to renounce foreign citizenships, foreign countries generally do not consider such renunciation valid, so such people are usually still citizens of their original countries, under those countries’ laws.

      • Dick

        I am originally a US citizen and hold a US and Australian passport.  The US government does not require you to give up your US passport if you obtain citizenship in another country.  In my case, I was a permanent resident in Australia and due to work requirements needed an Australian secret clearance that required citizenship in Australia.  When I received the Australian citizenship I went to the US Consulate and signed a document that stated the reasons for the citizenship and that I did not wish to give up my US passport.  The only requirement is that I use the US passport when entering and exiting the US.  In addition, my children were declared as Birth’s Abroad and also hold US passports.  Surprisingly, my wife was born in England obtained British passports for herself and the children due to birthright.  So they hold US, Australian, and British passports.  The do not know how lucky they are!  

      • Cory Carlson

        I also hold US, Canadian and British Citizenships. So yes, you may hold multiple-citizenships as a US citizen.

      • concerndcitizen

        The U.S. doesn’t want to give up the extra worldwide income taxes they can collect.

  • curiouser-and-curiouser

    How do we get more details about the processes in Singapore, Brazil and Belgium?  Just set up a local company in Singapore – what at the costs and requirements? I’m past military service age unless they want guys that are nearly 50!

  • Boomer1

    Simon, I like your newsletter and think your information is normally good.  But in the case of Singaporean citizenship, you are dead wrong. I live in Singapore and have for several years.  I have had PR for 5 years, through a register company I have here, and have applied for citizenship 3 times in the past 2 years and have not, yet, obtained it. The rules have changed and not only is citizenship difficult to obtain, but so is PR. You must show more than a registered company and the minimum investments have gone WAY up.

    • vagabond

      Simon,
      You may have cited outdated facts.

      After last election where the ruling party was bombarded with criticism about it’s lax immigration policy and only manage to narrowly won the election – the gov made about turn !!

      It’s tough to be a citizen nowadays.  Heck, it’s even tough just to get a permanent citizenship.  I knew several very qualified peoples denied PR again and again.

      Anyway, doubt anyone could ‘LEGALLY’ hold dual passport.  One of the requirements for obtaining citizenship is a “Letter (from Embassy) of Citizenship Renouncement”

    • feras

      What about the employment if you are a full time employee can I get the PR?

  • Eljones

    What’s happened to Botswana – it always used to be the most valuable travel document in the planet. But, then maybe they don’t have a place for americans!

  • Mike

    Need a good lawfirm in brazil to begin the process.

    • Evelinfroes

      As I see you know something about Brazil, at least!

    • marcos989

      Need a good law firm to rent an apt. in Brazil.

  • Tookl

    I have dual citizenship although I am American. It is just “frowned upon” though not illegal.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MXL57AAJZAGRVZ2LOHVZQCTSUE Jack Allen

    How about Caribbean countries like Trinidad?

  • http://www.BreakingOut.NET/ Kevin Wells

    Belgium has very high income taxes and social insurance costs and it also scores very low in the world league table of most favourable countries to run a business from. 

    It does have one big plus regarding taxation: profits from capital gains are not taxed. For this reason Belgium is popular with asset-owning people from the Netherlands.

    • Hmd3000

      Any contact for any law firm that can help in the Belgium’s naturalization process?
       

  • http://www.BreakingOut.NET/ Kevin Wells

    Another thing re Belgium. I’d say the benefits of a Belgian passport are not so much to do with Belgium per se, but simply because it means you have rights to live, work and move around within the whole of the EU.

  • Rng2

    There are two great things about Brazil. One, they refuse to extradite their citizens to answer for foreign crimes.

    What type of knuckle-headed logic is that? Are you suggesting that it is good policy for a country to have a zero accountability culture? Maybe Brazil’s slogan should be “Commit the crime, then come relax on our beaches.”

    • Evelinfroes

      Hey, know my country laws before judging! Brazilian citizens who have committed crime abroad do answer for their crimes here in Brazil!

      • marcos989

        No, not always.

    • Celso Pinheiro

      What about I tell you Italy do not extradite citizens?
      Whats about I tell you US do not extradite citizens?

  • Logan

    “2) BRAZIL. There are two great things about Brazil. One, they refuse to extradite their citizens to answer for foreign crimes. It just doesn’t happen.”
    Err no! Brazil has bilateral extradition agreements with several countries including USA. If anyone knows Spanish or Portuguese, here’s a complete list of extradition treaties:  http://www2.mre.gov.br/dai/extrad.htm

    • Evelinfroes

      Logan, unfortunately you are wrong. Brazilian Constitution expressly forbids extradition of brazilian citizens once they come back to Brazil after committing crime abroad.

      • marcos989

        Actually Brazil will not extradict anyone that is the responsible parent of a Brazilian child once the child is born. Period. No matter what crime. Until that child reaches 21 yr’s old.

      • carefix

        It is almost as good as being a banker – although they have the added advantage of being treated like nationals from a foreign country with which we have no extradition treaty and can stay home.

  • Hiday_happy

    is this article just about money and food??i beleive we can protect ourself no matter way…dont worry i can protect my family

  • DesertNomad

    I have looked into setting up in Singapore but it looks rather expensive and complex. How is it “easy”?

  • David
    • Angry at Simon’s IL type artic

      You need to read the website again David, it is 100,000 for one person, and 200,000 if he wants to actually bring his wife and children like normal people. PLUS other costs on top of that. Have a nice time with that.

  • Cn27

    SINGAPORE DOES NOT OFFICIALLY ALLOW DUAL CITIZENSHIP, UNLESS THINGS HAVE CHANGED SINCE I LAST REVIEWED THE MATERIALS LAST YEAR.

  • Pvfco

    what about Canada?

    • http://causalitysend.mee.nu/ Kristophr

      Canada is excellent, but citizenship requirements have been seriously tightened.

  • Dad

    How do I get American citizenship easily. I’m british, and white. And I have money.

    • AnotherDouglas

      Last I knew any legal alien or other immigrant with 1 million dollars of equity who starts a business that can employ 12 people can be granted citizenship; you go to the head of the line with no waiting period.

      • Nic

        If u have 1 million, keep it for your self And have a nice life outside of USA….

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_DBTHAEQ3W7L4DQPDSZSGKSNRNM Roland Day

      That is what you don’t want.

    • Alex

      ‘I’m British and white’. It’s not different if you are ‘British and black’

      • hi there

        funny – funny because its true

    • http://causalitysend.mee.nu/ Kristophr

      Don’t inflict a US citizenship on yourself. The IRS ( taxmen ) will hound you forever. If you are a brit, I suggest trying to get a Canadian passport. Or just buy a condo in St. Kitts, and get citizenship there.

  • Rob Meier

    St Kits is pricey.  If you buy a house for say 300K(no mortgage, cash) you are all set.  There is no federal income tax. Taxes are levied thru a 80% duties tax(ouch).  So if I had a business in the US and decided to live in St Kits, when I needed money to live and had it transferred there it would COST.

  • kitty

    For Brazil:   I am married to a Brazilian.   It is relatively easy to get a vista permanente–a permanent residence visa–for family reunion purposes.  If you are married for more than 5 years, the consular office will grant that visa in no more than ten working days after turning over the application and supporting documents and affidavits.  There will be no shipment of papers to Brasilia for approval.

    Citizenship is possible after 4 years of permanent residence  and you need not give up your current citizenship.   I would like Simon to cite sources stating that Brazil grants citizenship in less time.

    Brazil does not invade other countries and its last international war occurred nearly 150 years ago.   However, you will need to deal with a bureaucracy that is modernizing technologically, and that could increase burdens and cut off the ‘jetinho’ or ‘corruption’ that acts as a social safety valve.   Unlike the USA, these relationships are very important.

    Importing goods to Brazil can be costly and difficult.   If you choose to relocate, remember that you must not have lived in Brazil for a year prior to migration in order to bring in your stuff duty free.   Otherwise, you face customs duties or tariffs that would have been Abraham Lincoln and the Yankees’ ‘wet dreams’ back in 1860.  

    Taxation is a big issue that keeps most Brazilians down and dependent on government ‘favors’.   In fact, the government has created an economic caste system that segments the population into income bands.  

    • TaxSlave

      Sorry but after one year, I can bring my stuff duty free?

  • BorisV

    Pitfalls for Israeli passport should mention that you will not be allowed travel to quite a few countries with it.

    • Brianna Aubin

      Yeah, but presumably if you’re doing this as your second citizenship, then you still have your first passport. Just travel on that one.

      • abba

        Defeats the purpose of having a second citizenship.

      • Andrew

        An Israeli can travel to most of the countries that a European or American can access. The major exception is Muslim majority countries (and even then there are exceptions) and countries that Israel can go to. It is true that if you are American or European the passport benefits of Israeli citizenship is relatively less but an Israeli passport is ranked extremely high (after America or Europe) as passports go.

  • Estimate_dept

    Of all the information out there this is LIFE saving. Consider that the news wont report real stuff like the following; farmers getting arrested for growing heirloom seeds or churches for having food banks. Both in the state of Mo. and NY.

  • Sarsoun

    I think that Ireland has something for people who are of Irish descent. Also, if you’re a writer, I believe there is further incentive. Check it out.

  • Mims

    Does any know the cost and benefit of having a dual USA and Polish citizenship?

    • Gret

       Poland, like most countries will leave you alone if you don’t reside there, so no drawbacks.  Don’t know about conscription, though.  Since Poland is part of the EU, you can work and reside in many/most EU countries quite easily.

      US will tax you even if you are nonresident. 

      • Celso Pinheiro

        Yeap, US is one out of three countries in the world that tax you based upon nationality…

  • Christopher

    I have done some research on naturalizing as a Japanese citizen in Japan and it does not take ‘two decades’ as mentioned above but just 5 years of continuous residence and that doesn’t even have to be on PR, it just has to be legal and continuous.

    They do require that you show evidence of ‘effort’ to renounce your other citizenship(s), however.

    I’ve been given to understand that the formal rules surrounding this are few and it practically hangs on the on the discretion of the officer handling your application. Background checks will be extremely thorough. They will ask you lots of very personal questions in order to try and ascertain your character and your motives for wanting to be Japanese and a whole load of other questions just for good measure.

    Google reveals that in 2010 99% of over 13000 applicants were successful. I’m considering it myself; I wouldn’t mind learning a minimum of grade 2 Japanese and I love Japanese girls. Japanese passport is good quality paper.

    • KnowitallSud!

      Yeah right, if you have spent most of your five years on a tourist visa with the in-out to korea strategy employed by most gaijins(while working ofcourse!As much as your lot complains about mehicans, you do the same in Japan) or as a enkei english teacher earning lower than nation average per capita and with some useless degree, at AEON or somewhere…I am sure the immigration authorities would just LOVE you, inspite of having Chinese students turned workers or Indian IT engineers in line for citizenship, they would choose you..esp your reason:”I love Japanese girls and have JLB 2 lvl Japanese skills yo” would resonate marvellously with the authorities no, doubt!

      • Justin

        Dude I live here in Japan you are still a gaijin. lol get this the better your japanese gets the less popular you will be. Get used to being a one trick pony. Everyone wants to hear your english even if they have no clue what you are saying. Also get used to being lonely, strangers dont talk to eachother, there are no bars like in the states, friends hang with friends and it takes time to work into the inter circle. I speak good japanese and have lived here for 6 months now and I miss home already also japanesee are fake nice and wont tell you how they actually feel so get used to fake aquaintances.

    • David Kessel

      And they’ll still call you a “gaijin”. You can’t naturalize your face.

  • Brianna Aubin

    I’ve actually considered the Israeli route… I’m not Jewish, but I have friends in the country and even know some of the language. OTOH, besides the little factor of conscription, there’s their geostrategic situation w.r.t. their “lovely neighbors.” You don’t truly grasp how tiny the country is, and how near they are to those who want to kill them, until you’ve actually been there and crossed the entire east-west distance of the country in less than 2 hours by car.

    • remat

      yes, brianna. Im sure their lovely neighbors feel the same way about you living on their land that was in some cases illegally taken by force.

      • Andrew

        Israel needs its army to make sure it doesn’t get “wiped off the map” as the Arab world tried to do in 1948, 1967, and 1973 and Iran continues to try to do today. That is what Brianna is referring to. But I agree with Brianna that Israel is a great place to live despite its geopolitical situation. Great weather, beautiful country and freedom of religion and expression like in any other Western country.

      • jack

        Andrew, what Israel are you talking about? You can’t vote or get married in that country unless you are Jewish. Bad place to live if you are not a Jew.

      • Andrew

        Christians can marry other Christians in Israel. Muslims can marry other Muslims in Israel. But if a person from one religion marries someone from another religion, the marriage is only recognized if it it performed outside of Israel (unless of course, one person converts). What that means though, is that gay marriage is recognized in Israel if it took place in France, England, or Scandinavia. Even the United States (national government) doesn’t recognize same sex marriages from Europe.

      • Xerxes0

        You forgot to ad extremely exciting place, they are too reliant on the US funding, another Obama or isolationist President may make life very difficult. Weapons cost real money.

    • Numan

      Dear i am from Pakistan can u guide me how can i get immigration from there.

      • Faiyaz Ahmed Awan

        we can process permanent Residence and passport of Paraguay…all you have to do is to email us your CV and after that we shall email you back all the document requirements along with expense details together with full procedure..

        our email id is…silkwayconsultants@gmail.com

  • KnowitallSud!

    Japan takes only 5 years to give citizenship and it is a great country with the largest city on earth(Tokyo), one of the oldest intact cities(Nara, Kyoto), unlimited fun/entertainment opportunities(pachinko parlours, jet boat races, macau a boat ride away, multiplexs, great movies, good food etc), full employment(something barely any country of reasonable size has in the west), low/non-existent crime, hitech technology(most of which are Jspecials) and a free atmosphere..women are women everywhere, only a juvenile/unskilled economic immigrant would prefer some women based solely on here race/nationality.

    I prefer Japan for all the above mentioned reasons.Even if one is single and is not interested in marriage but wants to live in a decent country, Japan makes a fine choice what with its multiple michellin stared restaurants, affordable heritage houses and moderately stable apartmento housing stock(in price terms).Also, they have some pretty intersting creative scene there.

    Wonderful country and very polite people.Life would be easy and living a pleasure with sensory stimuli and the opportunity to start a family if one seeks it.

    Nippon Banzai ^_^

    • ter ber

      And if you like nuclear radiation their is plenty of it coming from Fukushima. You will never need a tanning booth again!

      • Justin

        hope you speak Japanese. I live in Japan and let me tell you no one speaks english, except the chinease that live here. And yeah its a nice place to live if you like working 18hr days with like no vacation time. lol. Oh yeah and he is right they are racist here.

    • David Kessel

      But they are so racist. Most people will not even rent to you. Restaurants, hotels, clubs, onsen have a Japanese Only policy. Kind of like S. Africa with its “white only” but no one is protesting.A one million gaijin march on a Diet? Not any time soon.

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  • Alan Smith

    This is bullshit. Singapore is one the hardest place on earth to get citizenship. I have been living here for 5 years, married to a Singapore citizen, earning more than 5k USD a month. But my Permanent Residence was rejected 3 times. Till i gave up applying. I have friends who are living here on a PR for 10 years and still their citizenship application got rejected.

    • feras

      Hello Alan, Thanks a lot for your feedback, I was planing to land singpore as an employee and the empoyer has told that I can get the PR after 3 years, so what do you think, I was surprised of your comments, is there any official confirmation from the government.

      • Abacktoourrootsamerican

        If you are a young Chinese national, you’re in. Anything else, probably not looking good.

    • Angry at Simon’s IL type artic

      Don’t expect Simon to post real proof of anyone getting

      citizenship in any of these or other option countries as
      basically none exist, all anyone ever manages to get
      after a long time maybe is permanent residency NOT
      citizenship. Simon just posts programs, not real people
      talking about what really happens to them when they
      attempt to get citizenship.

      • Xerxes0

        The Aussies are keen to get people to take out citizenship, no bribes needed. It takes time but not all that long. You are right about a lot of countries delay and frustration.

      • Dylan

        Exactly, no real people who have actually acquired a passport legally from any country. I found this in the place I just acquired residency, getting residency is possible in almost any country, but citizenship and a passport is almost an impossibility except in the countries you would want to avoid like USA, CANADA, EU.

  • Joseph Otter

    Cambodia is another good option for citizenship by investment. I’ve heard it can be obtained there for as little as $15,000. Probably less if you manage to befriend a general. A lot of places it’s just about getting in with the right people. If you aren’t too happy with the U.S., their overreach, and their taxes Russia is also a great option. We all know that Russia won’t extradite it’s citizens for any reason and they have a flat tax rate of 13%. To become a citizen there though you’ll have to learn to speak Russian and reside there for at least 3 years. Marriage might help if you don’t want to go through all that. If you really want a second citizenship it helps to think outside the box. I bet you could easily take a trip to South Africa or somewhere and pay a local to marry you. Then go shop around for a corrupt official and give them a considerable “gift” encouraging them to sign a document saying that you and your new wife have been married for 5 years. After that you can just go apply for citizenship and a passport. Many places have different ways of doing things than what we’re used to in the west. If you manage to find a weak link in a particularly corrupt country your path to citizenship can be made easier and quite less expensive than outright citizenship by investment.

    • Sergey

      I not recommend Russian citizenship unless you will never come to Russia because Russia became more and more police state, same as U.S. I’m Russian citizen and sometimes I think about renounce from my citizenship.

      • Joseph Otter

        Police state? Hmm. I’ve always liked Russia because of the lack of political correctness, it’s size, and it’s culture. I also like that as an English speaker who’s worked in the ESL industry for quite a few years I could stand to make a HUGE amount of money if I were to open a small language school in a city like Moscow one day. I’ve even thought about joining the Russian Army or Navy for five years as path to citizenship. I’m still actually thinking about doing that. I’ve got a few more years to go before I’m 30 so we’ll see. I’m the adventurous type.

      • concerndcitizen

        Probably best to chat with someone like Sergey before walking down that plank. ;)

      • David Kessel

        Russia is not bad if you are an Aryan white person. If you are any darker than that, don’t bother.

      • Joseph Otter

        I’m Aryan white 100%. Trust me I’ve done my homework. Every Russian I’ve talked to about this plan has told me the same thing (that I’m fucking crazy.) For me though I’ve only got two choices being the young man that I am. Either do something like joining the Russian army for five years and try to stay out of trouble or end up spending about 5 years in some South American prison for trying to smuggle drugs to Europe. No matter what I’m not interested in returning to the USA.

      • David Kessel

        I was talking about Russia’s social not legal aspect. Well, if you support Russia’s policies, I guess that is a path for you.
        You may also want to consider teaching in the Middle East.

      • Joseph Otter

        Yeah I know. All of Tesak’s youtube videos that I used to watch when I started learning Russian made it very clear what Russia’s like concerning social issues lol. I support Russia’s policies. SLAVA RUSSIA!!!

      • Xerxes0

        Find yourself a corker Aussie shiela [or bloke if you are that way inclined] and get into Australia.

      • Dylan

        I agree with Sergey, I recommend Papua New Guniea

  • Corey Fischer

    How long would it take to be a citizen of the Philippines.

  • Phil

    Which countries will give you a passort if you get married there? Is there a list to choose from?

  • Xerxes0

    I was born in Australia but left when 19. My kids were born in the UK but all have Aussie passports as do the grand children.
    You can get Aussie citizenship by investment, once you have it goes automatically one generation and easy for 2 or more. Adopt a kid abroad the kid gets citizenship too. So many different races in Australia you don’t stand out what ever colour you are. You can also get in via marriage or being a partner including same sex partners.

    • Ken Lau

      i am from Singapore, I want to be Australian. pls intro me any gal who need a husband. email me laubanken@hotmail.com

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